close

Search Term

Enter a search term (optional)

Categories

Select One (optional)

Image

(optional)

Show only results that have an image


Holiday

Select as many as you like (optional)

  • Christmas
  • Cinco de Mayo
  • Earth Day
  • Easter
  • Fall
  • Father's Day
  • Halloween
  • Jewish Holiday
  • Kwanzaa
  • Mother's Day
  • New Year's
  • Patriotic Holiday
  • Spring
  • St. Patrick's Day
  • Summer
  • Thanksgiving
  • Valentine's Day
  • Winter
  • Back to School
  • Birthdays
  • Fourth of July
  • Labor Day
  • Memorial Day
Cuisine Type

Select as many as you like (optional)

  • American
  • Amish
  • Asian
  • Chinese
  • French
  • Greek
  • Indian
  • Italian
  • Japanese
  • Jewish
  • Mexican
  • Southern
  • Tropical

Seasonal

Select as many as you like (optional)

  • Spring
  • Summer
  • Fall
  • Winter
Cooking Method

Select as many as you like (optional)

  • Casserole
  • Grilling
  • Microwave
  • No Bake
  • Oven
  • Pressure Cooker
  • Skillet
  • Slow Cooker
Cooking Time

Select One (optional)

Preparation Time

Select One (optional)

Chill Time

Select One (optional)

Number of Ingredients

Select One (optional)

Slow Cooker Time HIGH

Select One (optional)

Slow Cooker Time LOW

Select One (optional)

AllFreeCasseroleRecipes.com

Menu

American Style Chop Suey

By: Steph from dairyfreeomnivore.com
American Style Chop Suey
American Style Chop Suey
This image courtesy of dairyfreeomnivore.com

American Style Chop Suey is an easy weeknight ground beef casserole. All you need to do it mix ground beef with tomato sauce, peppers, onion, and pasta. Bake that in the oven and enjoy. If you'd like to make it ahead of time, simply store it in the fridge until a half an hour before you want to eat. It's so simple, yet it's bursting with flavor. It won't be long until this is a family favorite. This ground beef casserole is sure to be a hit with both kids and adults alike.

Cooking Time20 min

Free recipes, giveaways, exclusive partner offers, and more straight to your inbox!

Your Recently Viewed Recipes

Include a Photo Include a Photo

Click the button above or drag and drop images onto the button. You can upload two images.

Cancel Reply to Comment

Thanks for your comment. Don't forget to share!

I share your love for recipes that you can use the next day for lunch. We do that a lot with pulled pork and chili by adapting the leftovers and reinventing a new dish out of the old. It gives us a way to eat the extras without wasting a ton of food. If we don't use it for a second dinner, then it is lunch the next day or into a container and in the freezer for someone to eat for lunch on a busy day when they are running short on time.

This only goes to another site with no recipes and then takes you to another site!! I still have not found the recipe

Just like many recipes on your website....I could not get the recipe to download. Not happy camper.

This is absolutely nothing like the Australian version of Chop Suey! No tomatoes in ours, but lots of cabbage. Certainly no capsicum (not seen in small country towns at all when I was growing up). And we used the only pasta available then: spaghetti. It was a huge family favourite. Isn't it odd that we used the same name for completely different recipes?

AuroraHawk, I apologize for the confusion about the recipe name. Like renegade159 said, it gets its name because the ingredients are chopped. You may like our American Chop Suey recipe, which is a more traditional recipe: http://www.allfreecasserolerecipes.com/Main-Dish-Casserole-Recipes/American-Chop-Suey

In reviewing the actual recipe, I think they refer to it as Chop Suey because all the ingredients are "chopped" instead of diced, sliced or anything else!! But, it looks a lot like my mother-in-laws GOULASH, which we all loved! We don't use the thyme, tho!!

I certainly agree with AuroraHawk. I clicked on this recipe hoping for a Chinese Chop Suey recipe! Why this pasta dish woud be called American Style Chop Suey is beyond my comprehension!!!

I don't know where it originated, but I can tell you that this dish was on the menu quite often in the dining halls at my college in Western New York, and it was called American Chop Suey. This was 40 years ago. I agree, it is much more like a goulash.

I am 75 years old and this has been called American Chop Suey ever since I can remember-and why is it so important that you have to question the name. Cant you just eat it and enjoy it

I can understand naming this dish, "American Style Goulash" but I'm baffled by the name, "American Style Chop Suey." Chop Suey has nothing to do with ground beef, pork, turkey or chicken. Nor does it have anything to do with pasta or tomatoes. From: Library of Congress, America's Library Website "Legend and History Legend has it that, while he was visiting New York City, Chinese ambassador Li Hung Chang's cooks invented the dish for his American guests at a dinner on August 29, 1896. Composed of celery, bean sprouts, and meat in a tasty sauce, the dish was supposedly created to satisfy both Chinese and American tastes. The Chinese diplomat was trying to create good relations with the U.S. And you know the old saying, "The way to a person's heart is through his or her stomach!" But is this legend true? Whether or not the tale is entirely true, Li Hung Chang definitely influenced the creation of chop suey. When Chang visited the U.S. in August 1896, cheering Americans lined the streets hoping to catch a glimpse of this important visitor and his famous yellow jacket. Children decorated their bicycles with yellow streamers to catch the ambassador's attention. As the guest of honor at grand feasts and elegant banquets, Chang declined the fancy food and champagne that was offered to him and ate only meals specially prepared by his personal chefs. In reality, chop suey was probably not invented by Li Hung Chang's chefs, but America's fascination with this royal visitor from Asia and his team of personal chefs gave rise to new interest in Chinese cooking. After 1896, Americans began to visit Chinese restaurants in large numbers for the first time. A chop suey fad swept big cities such as New York and San Francisco. Questioning the origins of the chop suey story, scholars suspect restaurant owners used the popular ambassador's name to inspire interest in a Chinese dish adapted for Americans. Newspaper owners used the same strategy to sell more papers. The New York Journal took advantage of Li Hung Chang's popularity to claim in an advertising poster, "Li Hung Chang Never Misses the Sunday Journal."

I've made this before and it's very good.It's easy to make,and last a long time. It can also be frozen to eat another day !

Close

Report Inappropriate Comment

Are you sure you would like to report this comment? It will be flagged for our moderators to take action.

Thank you for taking the time to improve the content on our site.

Recipe of the Day

Dump and Bake Pizza Pasta Casserole

"Family-friendly dinners don't get much easier than this Dump and Bake Pizza Pasta Casserole! There's no need to boil the pasta ahead… See more

Something worth saving?

Register now for FREE to:

  • SAVE all your favorite recipes
  • ADD personal notes
  • QUICKLY reference your recipes

 

Sponsored Content

Connect With Us

Facebook Instagram Twitter Pinterest Twitter
Blog Email RSS

About Us Advertise Contact Us FAQ Keyword Index Privacy Policy Subscribe Terms of Service Unsubscribe

---- 1 ----

close

Images from other cooks

There are currently no images from other cooks.